The Tricordant Blog

After a momentous week in which our political system yet again surprised us, I headed off to Liverpool for the annual NHS Confederation Conference to find out what the new Government was planning and what everyone made of it.

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Gil-Scott

This century has seen revolutionary advances in understanding how the mind and brain work. How we see what we see is fundamental to how we engage with the world around us.

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Sam Bates, Junior Consultant, reviews the recent Development Day hosted by Tricordant. The topic of the day was on ‘Systems Leadership / Systemic Leadership – the same or different?’ Sam reflects on the day and how it framed his learning.

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Nick Richmond, sits on the board of EODF. Here, he reviews the recent EODF London Event on Big Data in organisation design, development and workforce planning. An interesting read containing his own reflections from the event.   

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Devo-opportunity? Public sector leaders within the UK have been presented with an unprecedented opportunity. The new Conservative government faces the massive challenge of delivering more for less whilst devolving power within an increasingly complex political landscape amid continued economic and social volatility. Before the election the bold announcement of ‘Devo Manc’ promised unprecedented local powers

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In a recent survey CIPD reported that as many as 78% of UK organisations have experienced difficulties in attracting the right candidates in recruitment during the last year. This is not confined to niche areas of emergent expertise; it includes construction workers, retail, hospitality and health care in general. UK unemployment levels are falling and

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Lean Manufacturing’s full range of principles and tools can lead to a total reshaping of an organisation; its purpose, systems and culture. This is the paradigm shift that makes Lean outstanding when it works as a whole. Benefits are then measured not in mere percentage terms but by two fold and three fold improvements. The

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Management Levels? At some point when reviewing an organisation’s structure, the question inevitably comes up, ‘What’s the right number of management levels?’ Often peoples’ thinking starts from the wrong place; organograms, leadership spans-of-control, management grades and salaries. You know something has gone wrong when you see a structure with 2 or 3 people reporting into

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In my last blog I wrote about ‘Lightness’. I want to share another lesson from the Camino, one which brought my wife and I deep satisfaction. 250,000 people walk the Camino to Santiago each year. It takes 1 to 2 months to walk it all. We met people doing it for all sorts of reasons;

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A few months ago I found myself in a Post Office in mid Spain clutching a sun hat, Bible and a whistle. I gingerly offered them to the lady behind the  counter with a few Spanish words and a lot of artistic gestures. I wanted to parcel them up and send them on to the

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In our latest Tricord newsletter I wrote about planning in uncertainty and ended with the question, “How often do you think organisations should think about its future?” Jim Collins suggests this is a regular activity in companies which beat their industry index by 10 times (10X) over the long term, through what he calls “productive

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The phrase ‘missing middle’ has cropped up a few times recently, and it’s a concept would like to explore more. We need your help. Francis Christie, one of Tricordant’s partners, recently wrote about ‘missing middle managers’; those who create the vital link between strategy and delivering results, but who are frequently starved of the time

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We believe that if you could get all people in an organisation rowing in the same direction toward a common vision, you could dominate that industry, in any market, against any competition. Tricordant have supported a series of transformational projects with commercial engineering/industrial companies over the last year that have happily forced us to evolve

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At a recent Associates’ day we posed a question about public sector reform and one of the issues the debate revealed was about the language we use and how it influences how we think. For example when people are in “public-service-receiving” mode they are often referred to by a variety of terms including clients, patients,

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In the world’s largest public 2500 companies nearly 90 percent of new CEOs have not been a CEO before. The average time in post of a Chief Executive in the NHS is 700 days. We always knew these jobs were tough and exposed. So what? What is it about CEOs that they don’t stay around

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I’ve recently read “How Doctors Think” by Jerome Groopman, MD. It is a fascinating book in which Professor Groopman explores the thinking processes that are taught and practised by doctors. In medical school students are taught to use logical sequential processes to come to diagnoses, sometimes based on Bayesian statistical decision-making. Usually the thinking processes

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Roger and Simon have previously highlighted the importance of leadership and the reinforcing systems necessary to sustain compassion in organisations. I want to share some thinking about how the organisation’s senior leaders can create the strategic context to promote and sustain these individual and systematic aspects of compassion and humanity within their organisation. My personal

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A little while back I had the misfortune of being admitted to a hospital in London as an emergency for 24 hours. At the end of that brief period of time I felt as though I had been cared for in three different hospitals. Here’s why. I was taken initially to A&E where I was

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