Continuing on from the success of our 2016 series of Thought Networks, Tricordant are pleased to announce that we will be running a new series on the following topic;

 

‘Behavioural science and the art of leadership’.

 

What is it?

If you are a Homeland fan, you may have been intrigued by the words of the poet-rapper in the opening credits:

 

“The first revolution is when you change your mind about how you look at things, and see there might be another way to look at it that you have not been shown. What you see later on is the results of that, but that revolution, that change that takes place will not be televised.[1]

 

Nearly 50 years later we have seen revolutionary advances in understanding how the brain works and shapes our behaviour. How we see what we see is fundamental to how we engage with the world around us, and how leadership is exercised in that world.

 

When will it be?

Tricordant will be hosting two events on this topic and we invite you to choose which one suits you best.

 

David Cahill, Director- Wokingham Locality for Berkshire Healthcare Foundation Trust will be hosting the first event on Thursday 11th May 2017.

 

Simon Inger, Talent Development Manager at the University of Bath will be hosting the second event on Tuesday 23rd May 2017.

 

We will be meeting at 10am for a 10:30am start. The day will end by 4:00pm. Lunch and refreshments will be included and there will be an opportunity to network.

 

For those of you new to Thought Networks, these events aim to create a safe space for leaders and managers to think out loud, network and learn from one another about issues of common interest, shared challenges and experiences in the reality of their work.

 

This will be an intimate gathering in order to create the desired safe space and as such, places are limited (maximum 20). We will be applying a first come, first served rule. If you are interested, please email Emma Engstrom, at emma@tricordant.com, who will confirm venue details.

 

The events are free of charge and work to some simple rules:

 

  • Chatham House principles will operate.
  • The events are for mutual benefit, learning and thinking out loud.
  • Participants will share their experience and learning within boundaries of commercial confidentiality.
  • Participants are positively encouraged to network and buddy one another where they share common challenges.
  • Ideally, the events will be hosted by participants in turn.

 

We are keen for a dynamic conversation and would like to offer you the opportunity to bring a colleague either from your organisation or perhaps a system partner who may find the subject of particular interest. If this is the case, please let us know their details if they are able to attend.

 

[1] Gil Scott-Heron, 1970, The Revolution will not be Televised